Theory of Change

Theory of Change is a specific type of methodology for planning, participation, and evaluation that is used in the philanthropy, not-for-profit and government sectors to promote social change. Theory of Change defines long-term goals and then maps backward to identify necessary preconditions.

The YGAM Theory of Change describes the types of interventions that bring about the outcomes depicted in the pathway of a change map. Each outcome in the pathway of change is tied to an intervention, revealing a web of activity that is required to bring about social change.

Social Issue

Young people are potentially at risk of becoming drawn in to problematic gambling or social gaming, given the availability and access to such activities. There is very limited awareness education of this risk in schools, colleges and community organisations, compared with alcohol, drugs and safe sex education.

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Enabling factors

Specialist education consultants are recruited and trained by YGAM. These colleagues then support schools, colleges and community organisations to embed a professional programme around the potential risks of gambling and gaming in to their PHSE (or similar) curriculum.

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Target

Teaching and other professionals who have influence over young people's personal and social development, with a focus on those whom support young people aged 11 – 21 years initially.

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Evidence

Facebook

36% of under-16s played an online gambling-style game on Facebook in the last 7 days.

Pie Chart

A third of all calls to the National Problem Gambling helpline are from those under the age of 24yrs.

143,000

The number of young people aged 12-24 years experiencing gambling-related harm.

9 Percent

Only 9% of young people experiencing gambling-related harm reach out for help or support.

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Tablets

64% of under-16 year-olds played an online gambling-style game on their Smartphone or tablet in the last 7 days.

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Fruit Machine

Great Britain is the only Western democracy that allows children of any age to bet on limited stake (Category D) fruit machines.

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Activities

Professional colleagues from schools, colleges and community organisations are recruited to participate and be trained.

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Specialist YGAM education consultants support the school, college or community organisation to embed the YGAM programme, evidencing delivery and impact.

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Young people, aged 11 – 21 years, participate in an accredited and quality-assured programme to understand the potential risks from gambling or social gaming.

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Data is captured from teaching professionals to understand the perceived effectiveness of the YGAM programme on raising awareness of gambling and gaming related issues; the perceived effectiveness of the programme of increasing resilience to the potential 'normalisation' effects of gambling. YGAM also captures feedback on the rigour and methodology of the YGAM educational resources.

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Outputs/Outcomes

People

YGAM aims to train at least 650 practitioners in 2017/18, reaching up to 97,500 young people.

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Lightbulb

Young people are made aware of the potential risks to enable them to make informed decisions around gambling and gaming.

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Tick

Young people know the triggers to problem gambling and gaming and where to get help.

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Credit Cards

Young people's financial capability and digital literacy are improved.

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Ultimate Goal Ultimate Goal

Professionals are confident to deliver a programme around the potential risks of gambling and social gaming as part of a PSHE programme within their school, college or community organisation. In addition, young people are informed of the potential risks and are able to make informed decisions around gambling and social gaming.